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The great pineries of the southern states contain, on an aver age, about 5,000 feet, board measure, of standing timber per acre. Of white pine the heaviest county in Minnesota is esti mated to contain an average of 5,000 feet, while others, regarded as forested, contain 1,000 to 2,000 feet; and a tract containing 10,000 feet per acre is regarded as heavily forested. Contrast these figures with the following: The average stand of redwood upon 173,000 acres in Mendocino county is 44,000 feet per acre. There is here nearly nine times as much timber on an acre as in the southern pineries; yet even this is exceeded in Humboldt county. Upon 96,443 acres in this county the average stand is 84,000 feet per acre, nearly seventeen times as great as in the southern states. The lumber companies around Eureka, California, the principal center of the redwood industry, have realized, since they commenced operations, an average of between 75,000 and 100,000 feet per acre, and one of these companies has for ten years cut an average of 84,000 feet per acre of red wood alone, besides fir and spruce, which would increase the amount to nearly 100,003 feet. These last figures are not in any way estimates, but the actual products of the mills. The dis proportion is even greater than appears here, for the standard for lumber used in the redwood country is much higher than in the east, and consequently the estimates of the amount of timber are correspondingly less. For instance, whereas in the east logs eight inches in diameter are cut and sent to the mill, and knotty stuff is sawed, on the Pacific coast nothing less than 16 inches in diameter is sawed, and clear lumber only. If the redwood were used as economically as the southern pine, these estimates of its stand might easily be 50 per cent greater. The forests of Washington and Oregon are very heavy, but they by no means equal the redwoods in density. The most heavily forested county in Washington, Skagit, contains an average on its forest land of but 28,000 feet per acre, and in Oregon the stand is no greater. Of course, there are in these states individual acres, and even square miles, which are vastly more heavily forested; but so, also, are there in the redwood strip. On Mad river, near Eureka, a lumber company is at work in a tract of several square miles which actually cuts 150,000 feet per acre.

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