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Wild Gliders



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I Believe I Can Fly
Photography by Tim Laman

Giant webbed hands and feet become airfoils when a Wallace’s flying frog soars in the night. Flying frogs are so highly maneuverable that they can even make sharp turns in midair. Gliding seems an efficient way to move about: Not only can the frogs descend rapidly to breeding sites near the forest floor, they also don’t have to climb all the way to the ground to move from one tree to the next.



Camera: Canon EOS1nRS
Film Type: RDP Pushed 1 stop
Lens: Canon EF 50mm macro lens
Speed and F Stop: 1/250 @ f/11
Weather Conditions: After a heavy rain in the dripping forest.
Time of Day: Middle of the night—around 12 to 1 a.m.
Lighting Techniques: Three strobes were used at a very short flash, duration of about 1/6000 second, to freeze the frog in mid glide.

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT OR COMMENTS:
An infrared beam trigger was used to fire the camera and strobes at just the right instant.


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