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Dawn of Humans: Who Were the First Americans?



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Down to the Last Bone
Photograph by Kenneth Garrett

David Yesner, an archaeologist with the University of Alaska Anchorage, displays a bison jawbone and other artifacts at Broken Mammoth, one of the oldest archaeological sites in Alaska. Some 70 miles (113 kilometers) southeast of Fairbanks, the site dates from about 13,800 years ago. At that time lower sea levels left the land bridge known as Beringia high and dry, giving people a route to walk from Siberia to Alaska. Some new theories suggest that people may have reached the Americas by other routes, but Yesner is skeptical. “I still believe in the land bridge,” he says. To him the variety of tools found at these sites indicates a people who, while they probably hunted mammoths on occasion, also took advantage of many other sources of food, from birds to rodents. “These guys were going after everything that was there,” he says.



Camera: Nikon F5
Film Type: Kodak E100SW
Lens: 18mm
Speed and F-Stop: Not recorded
Weather Conditions: Rain
Time of Day: Noon
Lighting Techniques: Natural light





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