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Palmyra



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An Emerald Islet
Photograph by Randy Olson

Lush foliage sprouts from Palmyra, a paradise in a remote area of Polynesia purchased from a Honolulu family by the Nature Conservancy. A band of darker blue marks a ship channel dredged when the atoll was used by the U.S. military as a naval way station and aircraft refueling depot during World War II. Part of the Line Islands lying a thousand miles south of Hawaii, Palmyra sits atop the remnant of a submerged volcano. Some 680 acres (275 hectares) rise above water, and more than 15,500 acres (6,275 hectares) of lagoons and submerged reefs fringe Palmyra’s shores.



Camera: Nikon
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia 50
Lens: 20-35mm zoom
Speed and F-Stop: 1/250 @ f/4
Weather Conditions: Broken clouds
Time of Day: 11 a.m.
Lighting Techniques: None





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