Nationalgeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 


Frogs



<< Back to Feature Page



View exclusive photographs and get the facts behind the frame.


Click to ZOOM IN >>


Click to ZOOM IN >>


Click to ZOOM IN >>


Click to ZOOM IN >>





No Accounting for Taste
Photograph by George Grall

Antithesis of the picky eater, a Sonoran Desert toad savors a tarantula. “Toads and frogs are marvelous because they eat just about anything they can get in their mouths,” says herpetologist Cecil Schwalbe. That includes snakes, bats, birds, bugs, mice, fish, and other frogs. Toads, which lack teeth, swallow their prey whole. The Sonoran Desert toad is famous for producing a hallucinogenic substance on its skin. But psychedelic poachers beware: This toad is also highly toxic.



Camera: Nikon N 90S
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia 50
Lens: 105mm
Speed and F-Stop: f/22
Weather Conditions: Unrecorded
Time of Day: Unrecorded
Lighting Techniques: Strobe with light modifiers





© 2001 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE HOME Contact Us Forums Subscribe
[an error occurred while processing this directive]