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see caption Who You Lookin’ At?

Plump-bodied io moths bet their lives on surprise.  At rest this female Automeris  io covers the circular spots on her hindwings with her mottled brown forewings.  When disturbed, she pulls her forewings up, rapidly flashing what look like two big mammalian eyes at her startled attacker.  Score: moth 1, hungry bird, 0.

Photograph by Joseph Scheer
From National Geographic magazine, May 2002

see caption Luna Moth

The luna (Actias luna) is a big, strong moth, with wings three to four inches (eight to ten centimeters) across. But its flying life is short—just a week or two, spent dodging hungry birds and bats. Its beauty can be even more fleeting. “As soon as we collect a luna the color starts to fade,” Scheer says. “We have to get it on the scanner almost instantly to capture that luminous green.”

Photograph by Joseph Scheer
From National Geographic magazine, May 2002

see caption Hogs Wild

Pigs carved from lard sing their own praises in a display at the International Livestock Show in Chicago in 1942, when an underlying concern was the slim supplies of fat.

Photograph by J.C. Allen & Son
From National Geographic magazine, May 2002

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