NationalGeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 
Feature
More to Explore

Did You Know?
Related Links
Bibliography
NGS Resources

On Assignment

On Assignment

ZipUSA: Ames, Iowa
Step into the world of writers and photographers as they tell you about the best, worst, and quirkiest places and adventures they encountered in the field.

Zoom In

Get the facts behind the frame in this online-only gallery. Pick an image and see the photographer’s technical notes.

Zoom In Thumbnail 1
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Zoom In Thumbnail 2
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Zoom In Thumbnail 3
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Zoom In Thumbnail 4
Click to ZOOM IN >>


Map

Ames, Iowa

Map Thumbnail



50012

By Hillel J. HoffmannPhotographs by Scott Houston


"Quiet!" can only be shouted after-hours in a mega college dorm awash in high-decibel music and video games.



Get a taste of what awaits you in print from this compelling excerpt.

Recipe: Remove hundreds of teenagers from their homes, place them in three dorms in the middle of Iowa, stir.

Matt Bonsall, sophomore, fine arts. Owns two dog collars. Wakes up happy to live in Iowa State University’s Helser Hall. "When I go home, my parents want to lock me up. They don’t want the town to gossip about what I wear."

Melissa Sloniger, freshman, dairy science. Iowa Army National Guard, 1034th Quartermaster Company. Keeps a photo album of the family cows in Friley Hall dorm room. (Her pet cow Swiss Mocha attended her high school graduation party.)

Temple of the Screen: In 50012—one of the only U.S. zip codes populated solely by college students living in dorms—residents usually can be found a few feet from a television or computer monitor. "We play video games at least half the day," says freshman Tyler Manker. He’s exaggerating. A little. He estimates that he spends five hours a day playing video or computer games, two hours watching TV or videos, and an hour on the Internet. Oh, yeah—he also spends three hours in class and an hour or two doing homework.

A handful of students give joysticks a rest at a Bible study session in Friley. Life in the cheerfully profane world of the dorms isn’t easy for some Christians, but senior David Schladt, at right, doesn’t mind the language that drifts in from the halls. "It tests my faith," he says.

Get the whole story in the pages of National Geographic magazine.



Email a Friend

Subscribe

Forum
Nominate your favorite zip code for coverage in this magazine.

More to Explore

In More to Explore the National Geographic magazine team shares some of its best sources and other information. Special thanks to the Research Division.

Did You Know?
Iowa State University was one of the first land-grant universities in the United States. The history of the land-grant system of colleges and universities can be traced to the Morrill Act of 1862, which provided states with grants of 30,000 (12,000 hectares) acres of public land per senator and representative. In turn, proceeds from the sale of the land were to be used to endow one or more public universities "where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts…in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life."

Iowa was the first state to accept all of the Morrill Act’s terms, and the Iowa Agricultural College and Model Farm, as Iowa State was called when chartered in 1858, officially opened as the state’s land-grant institution in 1868. As the system of land-grant colleges and universities grew to its current total of 105 schools—with the addition of historically black colleges following the Morrill Act of 1890, and the inclusion of Native American tribal colleges in 1994—so too did Iowa State. From its original student population of 68 in the fall of 1868, today the university serves 27,823 students on its 1,984-acre (802.9-hectare) Ames campus.

Thomas Bruey

Did You Know?

Related Links
Iowa State University
www.iastate.edu/
All there is to know about Iowa State can be found here at the university’s homepage. Learn about the school’s history, read recent news, and find links to academic programs and other university departments.

Ames, Iowa
www.ames.ia.us/
Find all manner of information on the city of Ames at this page, maintained by the Ames Chamber of Commerce. Links to statistics, city government, maps, and visitor information are all at your fingertips.

George Washington Carver
www.lib.iastate.edu/spcl/gwc/home.html
George Washington Carver, noted agronomist and educator, was the first African-American student to attend Iowa State—arriving in 1891. Learn more about his life, accomplishments, and the time he spent in Ames on this page from the university’s library.

Top


Bibliography
Erickson, Lori. Iowa: Off the Beaten Path. The Globe Pequot Press, 1999.

Schwieder, Dorothy. Iowa: The Middle Land. Iowa State University Press, 1996.

Top


NGS Resources
Dunn, Jerry Camarillo, Jr. "Rolling Road Trip: Carnival on Wheels Crosses Iowa by Bike," World (July 1998), 24-27.

Borah, Leo A. "Iowa, Abiding Place of Plenty: The State Where the Tall Corn Grows Provides the Nation with a Tenth of Its Food Supply," National Geographic (August 1939), 143-182.

Top


© 2002 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

National Geographic Magazine Home Contact Us Forums Shop Subscribe