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Russian Smokejumpers
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By Glenn HodgesPhotographs by Mark Thiessen



Talk about tough: These guys throw themselves out of 50-year-old aircraft into burning Siberian forests.



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Alexander Selin, the head of central Siberia's aerial firefighting force, is a man who knows how to make himself clear, even in English, a language he barely knows. The police, he tells us, are "garbage." Vodka is "gasoline." His driver? A "Russian barbarian." And caution . . . well, caution doesn't seem to be part of his vocabulary. Caution is for sissies and Americans. "No seat belts in Russia!" Alex barks as we speed away from a police checkpoint soon after our arrival in Krasnoyarsk, he and his driver unbuckling their belts in defiant unison.

After a few days in his care we will come to call Alex, simply, Big Boss. A thick-fingered, barrel-chested Siberian who hurls his words like shot-put balls, Alex rules a fiefdom the size of Texas with an army not much bigger than the Texas A&M marching band. His 500 smokejumpers, firefighters who jump from planes and rappel from helicopters, cover a swath of boreal forest that stretches from Arctic tundra to the Mongolian border.

Photographer Mark Thiessen and I have come to Siberia to see Alex's men in action, but by the time we're halfway from Krasnoyarsk to Shushenskoye, 200 miles (320 kilometers) to the south, I'm not sure we'll live long enough to see a single fire. We're throttling through the mountains in a pair of fume-filled Volgas, taking curves at 90 miles (145 kilometers) an hour, passing blind on hillcrests, narrowly avoiding one head-on collision after another—and I'm thinking wistfully back to our training in British Columbia, where Mark and I rappelled out of helicopters feeling as safe as the day we were born. Finally the lead car in our little caravan sideswipes a truck. We pull over to check the damage—a dented quarter panel—but the collective response is a shrug and a return to the road, full speed ahead.

So I'm not surprised the next morning when we board our first Mi-8, an 18-wheeler of a helicopter that is Russia's aerial firefighting workhorse, and there are no seat belts in sight—and practically no seats. Alex has taken our visit as an opportunity to host a half dozen cronies on a weekend fishing trip in the mountains, and when we land in a field to pick them up, gear gets piled willy-nilly between the two huge fuel tanks—a rubber boat here, an outboard motor there—and everyone plops down on whatever looks most comfortable.

That afternoon, over vodka shots at the fishing camp, Alex explains the Russian way of doing things. He's been to California and Idaho to see how American firefighters work, and when he thinks of riding in their helicopters—all strapped in by seat belts and regulations—he laughs at the memory. "No move, no speak!" he says. You can't size up a fire if you can't move around and look at it! You can't make a plan if everyone has to be quiet!

"And they call Russians crazy!" the pilot cuts in.

Having barely survived their driving, I'd say "crazy" seems about right, but you've got to be at least a little crazy to jump from a plane into a fire, and the Russians have been doing it longer than anybody.

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More to Explore

In More to Explore the National Geographic magazine team shares some of its best sources and other information. Special thanks to the Research Division.

Did You Know?
When the Soviets pioneered smokejumping under Stalin's communist regime, they were establishing an organization that would be copied in other countries around the world, including the United States. However, the Russian program grew from a unique team: of the 17 jumpers in 1937, one was a woman. The smokejumping organization in the United States did not include women until 1981—42 years after the program was started. Currently in the U.S. five percent of all smokejumpers are female.

—Maggie Bradburn

Did You Know?

Related Links
Russian Aerial Forest Fire Center
nffc.infospace.ru
This is the homepage for Avialesookhrana, Russia's aerial firefighting center. This website contains all the details, including photographs, about the Russian smokejumping organization.

Global Fire Monitoring Center
www2.ruf.uni-freiburg.de/fireglobe/
This site contains information on fires worldwide, as well as an up-to-date selection of articles written by and about Russian smokejumpers.

National Smokejumper Association
www.smokejumpers.com
Interested in what the smokejumpers in the United States are up to? Check out this site to read about the history of smokejumping in the U.S., the latest news about the program, and view pictures of teams in action.

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Bibliography
Fuller, Margaret. Forest Fires: An Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior, Management, Firefighting, and Prevention. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1991.

Pyne, Stephen J. World Fire. Henry Holt and Company, 1995.

Pyne, Stephen J. Vestal Fire. University of Washington Press, 1997.

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NGS Resources
Koch, Janice. "Smoke Jumpers," National Geographic World (August 1994), 15-17, 22.

"Forest Fire! Smoke Jumpers Get There First," National Geographic World (September 1975), 18-21.

Johnston, Jay, and Stuart E. Jones. "Forest Fire: The Devil's Picnic," National Geographic (July 1968), 100-127.

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