NationalGeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 

Forums

January 2003


We invite you to speak your mind on these hot topics and global issues plucked from the pages of National Geographic magazine. For more on the subject go to the online feature page, or read the January issue of NGM.


The Great Wall

The Great Wall

Its name is deceptive. China's Great Wall is, in fact, a series of walled structures. Erected over many centuries, it has kept invaders at bay, been pilfered for building materials, and borne the footsteps of countless travelers and tourists. The latter raises concern for preservationists, who claim that commercialization is damaging the archaeological treasure. How can antiquities such as the Great Wall, the Pyramids of Giza, or Stonehenge, for example, be accessible to visitors and still be preserved? And what, if any, restrictions should be imposed? Enter>>

Dreamweavers

Dreamweavers: Photo Manipulation

To illustrate the futuristic uses of textiles for "Dreamweavers," photographer Cary Wolinsky manipulated some images by using digital distortions and combining several photographs into one. Although these alterations are disclosed, today's technology makes some photo manipulations difficult to detect. What tips you off that a photograph has been altered? When does manipulation go too far? Enter>>

Dreamweavers

Dreamweavers

If clothes make the person, garments of the future are sure to keep us more connected. Currently, researchers are working on outfitting the ultimate dance diva with clothes that hide beat-keeping sensors and pants with lights that flash when she's being paged. A New York company is developing a T-shirt with conductive fibers and a transmitter that can monitor heartbeat, body temperature, blood oxygen, and respiration. With clothes this smart, the sky's the limit. What would you like your clothes to do for you? Enter>>

Japan's Winter Wildlife

Japan's Winter Wildlife

Japan's reverence for nature is ancient. Some wildlife, such as the red-crowned crane—symbol of happiness, longevity, and luck—are so highly regarded, but endangered, that the Agency for Cultural Affairs, in an effort to protect them, has designated them as natural monuments. But Japan's efforts to protect its wildlife are relatively young. The primary purpose of its national parks has been to attract people and create revenue; preservation of habitat for indigenous animals has been less of a priority. But available land is limited in such a small country. And without adequate habitat, the growing numbers of plants and animals will soon be in decline. With such restricted space, how can Japan preserve its wildlife? What kinds of grassroots efforts can help raise Japanese awareness? Enter>>

Hip Zips

Hip Zips

Nominate your favorite zip or postal code for coverage in the pages of National Geographic. Our magazine series—ZipUSA—takes a periodic peek at special corners of the country by zip code. We like the concept so much that we're going global and extending our stories to include international postal codes as well. So describe a weird, wacky, wonderful locale of your own choosing—it just might make it into the magazine—and read postings from other folks too. Enter>>

 

© 2003 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

National Geographic Magazine Home Contact Us Forums Shop Subscribe