NationalGeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 
Zoom In

Mayflies



<< Back to Feature Page



View exclusive photographs and get the facts behind the frame.

Mayflies Zoom In Thumbnail 1
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Mayflies Zoom In Thumbnail 2
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Mayflies Zoom In Thumbnail 3
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Mayflies Zoom In Thumbnail 4
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Mayflies Zoom In Thumbnail 5
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Mayflies Zoom In Thumbnail 6
Click to ZOOM IN >>



Mayflies Zoom In 5

Her Clock Is Definitely Ticking
Photograph by József L. Szentpéteri

Racing to fulfill her life cycle, a female mayfly joins thousands in a compensation flight, a clever strategy to ensure the next generation. If females laid their eggs at the same spot on the river where they emerge and molt, the eggs could float downstream to an unfamiliar and possibly unsafe area. So females fly several miles upriver before releasing their eggs. Eventually, the eggs float down to the females' original natal site and sink to the bottom. After about 45 days the eggs hatch into larvae, which remain buried in the mud for three years until they emerge and molt into adults, the cycle begun anew.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS IN
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia
Lens: 100mm Macro
Speed and F-Stop: 1/250 @ f/5.6

Weather Conditions: Clear
Time of Day: Night
Lighting Techniques: Laser triggers, flashes



© 2003 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

National Geographic Magazine Home Contact Us Forums Shop Subscribe