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Atlantic Salmon



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A Salmon Treadmill
Photograph by Paul Nicklen

While wild salmon hatch in gravel and spend their first year or more honing their survival skills in streams, farmed salmon are hatched in rows of plastic trays and then spend their freshwater phase swimming around a  tank like this 30-foot-diameter (10-meter-diameter) one in Port Alberni, British Columbia. Lights suspended above the tanks extend daylight hours in fall and spring to keep the fish feeding longer and growing faster. By the time they are transferred to sea pens, they are essentially domesticated fish. "They're not scared of anything," says veteran fish-farm diver Chris Grice of Tofino, British Columbia. He has watched farmed fish swim right into the jaws of their natural enemies: seals and sea lions. "You can pet these fish before they swim away," Grice adds, "just like the family dog."

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Specialized underwater remote camera
Film Type: Fujichrome 100
Lens: 18mm f/2.8
Speed and F-Stop: 1/60 @ f/16

Weather Conditions: Sunny
Time of Day: Morning
Lighting Techniques: I combined natural light with two Ikelite SS200 strobes for fill flash.
Special Equipment: Remote camera



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