NationalGeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 
Zoom In

The Samurai Way



<< Back to Feature Page




View exclusive photographs and get the facts behind the frame.

The Samurai Way Zoom In Thumbnail 1
Click to ZOOM IN >>

The Samurai Way Zoom In Thumbnail 2
Click to ZOOM IN >>

The Samurai Way Zoom In Thumbnail 3
Click to ZOOM IN >>

The Samurai Way Zoom In Thumbnail 4
Click to ZOOM IN >>

The Samurai Way Zoom In Thumbnail 5
Click to ZOOM IN >>




The Samurai Way Zoom In 3

Absolute Power
Photograph by Ira Block

The slightest of raised platforms signifies the exalted status of a shogun, shown in a mannequin display at Nijo Castle in Kyoto. In this ornate reception room—where bodyguards hid behind screens and a page held ready the shogun's sword—the warrior leader received visits from his feudal lords. The last of the shoguns came to this castle in 1867 to resign his office in the presence of the emperor. Decades of weak government and financial woes, and the inability of the shogun's forces to meet the threats of U.S. ships arriving in Japan's harbors, spelled the demise of samurai rule.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS IV
Film Type: Fujichrome Provia 100
Lens: 16-35mm lens @ 18mm
Speed and F-Stop: 1/30 @ f/8
Weather Conditions: Indoors
Time of Day: Unrecorded
Lighting Techniques: I used six strobes around the room.


© 2003 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

National Geographic Magazine Home Contact Us Forums Shop Subscribe