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Hanging On
Photograph by Mark W. Moffett

Camouflaged like shaggy bark, a maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus) taken from poachers clings to the safety of a tree at a rehabilitation center in Bahia. The most endangered of South America's five sloths, this shy species hides in the treetops and only descends to defecate and urinate—about once a week. It does not adapt well to captivity, breeding only in the wild. "Without forests there will be no maned sloths," says Vera Lúcia de Oliveira, a rescue volunteer. "Human beings need to think about the laws of nature and learn to respect them."

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS
Film Type: Fujichrome Provia 100
Lens: 100-400mm zoom
Speed and F-Stop: 1/500 @ f/5.6
Weather Conditions: Sunny
Time of Day: Unrecorded
Lighting Techniques: Natural light


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