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Dance of Death



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Reaching a Truce
Photograph by Yva Momatiuk and John Eastcott

Trying to reclaim their kill, the pack attacked again, but the bear drove them back. Within an hour, though, something remarkable happened: When one female wolf sidled up to the carcass and nibbled on the far end, the bear didn't react. Other members of the pack gradually joined her, and soon all the wolves were eating alongside the bear—a communal behavior rarely observed by biologists. The feast continued until only a few shards of bone were left to be pecked on by ravens. Why the sudden truce after days of growling and brawling? It remains a mystery.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS 3
Film Type: Fujichrome Provia 100
Lens: 600mm f/4
Speed and F-Stop: Unrecorded
Weather Conditions: Dark and overcast
Time of Day: Afternoon
Ligh
ting Techniques: Natural light
Special Equipment or Comments: We used a tele-extender, which is used with a fixed lens to multiply its focal length. The film was push processed.


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