NationalGeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 
Zoom In

Stormy Star



<< Back to Feature Page




View exclusive multimedia files in RealPlayer or Windows Media formats.

Stormy Star Multimedia Thumbnail 1
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 2
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 3
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 4
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 5
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 6
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 7
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 8
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 9
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 10
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Stormy Star Zoom Multimedia Thumbnail 11
Click to ZOOM IN >>



Stormy Star Multimedia

RealPlayer   Windows Media

Transit of Mercury

Video by Mats Löfdahl and Peter Dettori, Institute for Solar Physics of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Swedish 1-meter Solar Telescope

Mercury could be seen crossing the face of the sun on May 7, 2003. This video compresses the actual transit time of about five hours. Mercury aligns with the Earth and the sun 12 or 13 times a century. Far rarer: Venus could be seen crossing the sun last month for the first time since 1882. The transit of Venus in 1769 found observers around the globe—including Capt. James Cook in Tahiti—taking measurements in a joint effort to figure the distance from Earth to the sun. They were off by only two million miles. It's 93 million miles away, on average, and its light makes the trip in about eight minutes.




© 2004 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

National Geographic Magazine Home Contact Us Forums Shop Subscribe