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Solar Sonogram

Computer model by A. G. Kosovichev, T. L. Duvall, Jr., P. H. Scherrer, Stanford University. Data from SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager, European Space Agency and NASA.

Scientists can now see beneath the sun's blazing surface with a technique called helioseismology. Doppler instruments on SOHO and on Earth measure sound waves moving through the sun. Changes in wave speed reveal inner structures. Helioseismology confirms that the magnetism of a sunspot keeps the plasma below cool (blues) and blocks hot rising plasma (red).



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