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Wind Scorpions



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In Your Face
Photograph by Mark W. Moffett

Looking like something from a child's nightmare, this female wind scorpion (Galeodes sp.) is a little bundle of pure aggression. Endowed with startling speed, the wind scorpion, also known as the sun spider or camel spider, is equipped with jaws larger in proportion to its body size than almost any other animal on Earth. Though rarely longer than two inches (five centimeters), wind scorpions are capable of easily snapping a grasshopper in half. Some 1,100 species of wind scorpions, known to science as solifugids, inhabit the desert regions of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS3
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia 50
Lens: Canon 50mm f/2.5 macro
Speed and F-Stop: f/22
Weather Conditions: Dry
Time of Day: Night
Lighting Techniques: Unrecorded


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