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Wind Scorpions



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Exposed
Photograph by Mark W. Moffett

After its cover was blown, a male wind scorpion (Eremobates constricta) found under a rock in Baja California quickly scurried away to a new hiding place. Some species prefer shallow sand dunes. Others reside on rocky hillsides or burrow beneath desert scrub. In North Africa there is a superstition that sleeping on the desert floor risks having a wind scorpion eat your face, liquefy your legs, or lay eggs under your skin. Although such fears are groundless, the creatures do exude an enzyme that liquefies the flesh of their prey, which includes insects and scorpions, as well as small lizards, snakes, rodents, and birds.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon Canon EOS3
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia 50
Lens: Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 zoom lens at widest angle
Speed and F-Stop: f/16
Weather Conditions: Dry
Time of Day: Night
Lighting Techniques: I used a little flash fill.


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