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Wind Scorpions



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Eating Machine
Photograph by Mark W. Moffett

When it comes to nutrition, wind scorpions follow a low-carb, high protein diet, as a female (Eremorhax joshuaensis) devouring a desert night lizard in California's Mojave Desert demonstrates. Although they can inflict a painful bite on humans, they are not venomous. Nocturnal creatures, wind scorpions sense their prey using a wide array of chemical and mechanical cues. Their pedipalps, leglike appendages equipped with a battery of sensory organs, end in an adhesive sucker that assists the animal in grasping prey and in climbing. They routinely feed on live victims but will also scavenge dead animals.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS3
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia 50
Lens: Canon 50 mm f/2.5 macro with 1.5 extender
Speed and F-Stop: f/22
Weather Conditions: Dry
Time of Day: Night
Lighting Techniques: Unrecorded


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