NationalGeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 
Zoom In

Temple of Doom



<< Back to Feature Page




View exclusive photographs and get the facts behind the frame.

Temple of Doom Zoom In Thumbnail 1
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Temple of Doom Zoom In Thumbnail 2
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Temple of Doom Zoom In Thumbnail 3
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Temple of Doom Zoom In Thumbnail 4
Click to ZOOM IN >>

Temple of Doom Zoom In Thumbnail 5
Click to ZOOM IN >>



Temple of Doom Zoom In 5

Threads of History
Photograph by Ira Block

Remarkable survivors, these woven medallions defied great odds. Found at Huaca Cao Viejo, they date from the Lambayeque people (A.D. 900 to 1000), a major culture that dominated the area around El Brujo after the Moche. These faces evoke the main Lambayeque deity, Naylamp, known for his winged eyes. They also represent a rare find. Scholars believe that a series of El Niños caused major flooding that ruined Moche farming and fishing communities and eventually drove them from the region aroundA.D. 800. Periods of flooding continued through the centuries. So how did these delicate textiles survive? They stayed dry buried below thick layers of clay and adobe bricks, which preserved these gifts for history.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS 1v
Film Type: Fujichrome Tungsten 64
Lens: 100mm macro
Speed and F-Stop: Two seconds @  f/11
Weather Conditions: Indoors
Time of Day: Unrecorded
Lighting Techniques:  I used multiple tungsten lights with snoots.


© 2004 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

National Geographic Magazine Home Contact Us Forums Shop Subscribe