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Keeping Track of Clones
Photograph by Peter Essick

The branches of a cloned alpine currant bush obscure botanist Anton Burkart at the Swiss Federal Research Institute in Birmensdorf. This is one of 49 sites in a network known as the International Phenological Gardens of Europe, where 23 floral species, including this currant, furnish data on how climate change affects genetically identical plants in varied environments, ranging from Scandinavia to the Balkans and westward to Portugal. Scientists have recorded that the network's trees and shrubs are now flowering an average of six days earlier than when the program began in 1957.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon EOS 1V
Film Type: Fujichrome Provia 100
Lens: 17-35mm
Speed and F-Stop: 1/125 @ f/11
Weather Conditions: Sunny
Time of Day: Midday
Lighting Techniques: Natural light


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