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Was Darwin Wrong?



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Prickle Power
Photograph by Robert Clark

A short-beaked echidna, or spiny anteater, calls for thick gloves for a handler at the San Diego Zoo. "Spines are a good defense for an animal that is close to the ground and can dig in so only the spines are exposed," says Australian echidna researcher Stewart Nicol. Along with the duck-billed platypus, the echidna is a monotreme—a mammal that has retained some features of reptiles and birds, such as laying eggs. The most widely distributed of Australian mammals, the echidna is arguably the most successful.

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Mamiya Rz 67
Film Type: Fuji Provia 100F
Lens: 110mm
Speed and F-Stop: 1/250 @ f/22
Weather Conditions: Indoors
Time of Day: Afternoon
Lighting Techniques: The plastic beneath the anteater was lit from below while a hard light source from above lit the anteater.


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