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ZipUSA: 83011 @ National Geographic Magazine
   
By Margaret G. Zackowitz



At Teton Science Schools, kids learn where the wild things are: right outside their cabin door.



Get a taste of what awaits you in print from this compelling excerpt.

The mountains are the textbooks at Teton Science Schools; supplementary reading includes trees, wildlife, and weather. It all started back in 1967 with a plan for a summer-only tent camp teaching field ecology to local kids from Jackson Hole. These days the schools' Kelly, Wyoming, campus operates out of a scatter of log buildings on the grounds of an old dude ranch in Grand Teton National Park. Every week or so, year-round, a bus will rumble down the sage-tufted road to school with a new cargo of residential students. They might be from here in Wyoming or from a suburb outside Baltimore. They could be eight years old, eighteen, or older. But they'll all be handed journals to fill with their own words and pictures, and they'll all learn something before they go home. It might be about the world. It might be about themselves.

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More to Explore

In More to Explore the National Geographic magazine team shares some of its best sources and other information. Special thanks to the Research Division.

Did You Know?
In the center of Wyoming's state seal is a woman standing in front of a banner that reads "Equal Rights." The seal reflects the state's long history of advocating equal rights for men and women. In 1869 Wyoming was the first territory in the United States to pass a law allowing women to vote. Even in 1890, when it looked like the territory might actually be denied statehood unless that right was repealed, its legislature wired Washington that Wyoming would "remain out of the Union a hundred years rather than come in without the women." The Union conceded and admitted Wyoming as the 44th state. The town of Jackson (a few miles away from the Kelly campus of the Teton Science Schools) lays claim to electing the state's—and some say, the nation's—first all-woman town government in 1920. That year Grace Miller handily defeated Fred Lovejoy for the job of mayor 56 votes to 28, and local businesswoman Rose Crabtree, one of the four women who would make up the town council, defeated her own husband for the job. The elected women then appointed even more women to run the town. Pearl Williams became marshall; Marta Winger, the town clerk; Viola Lumbeck, treasurer; and Edna Huff, health officer. The rugged frontier, it was said, had become run by "petticoat rules." Why was Wyoming the setting for such revolutionary actions? Some historians theorize that the scarcity of women (only one-sixth of the population in 1870) may have encouraged the men to do whatever they could to make settling in Wyoming more attractive. Others suggest it stems from the rugged independence fostered by living on the frontier.
 
—Abby Tipton
Did You Know?

Related Links
Teton Science Schools
www.tetonscience.org
Visit this website to learn more about the adult and children's courses offered by Teton Science Schools and how to register for them.
 
Grand Teton National Park
www.nps.gov/grte
This park website offers extensive information to help you plan a visit to the Tetons. Learn about the wildlife that inhabits the park, the lodging possibilities, the history of the valley, and find a map outlining hiking trails.
 
Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce
www.jacksonholechamber.com
Want to know what's happening in Jackson Hole on a certain date? Want to see real-time photos of the town and its surrounding valley? Click here and check out the calendar of events and the numerous webcam links.

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Bibliography
Hoffman, Joanna. "A Nurturing Environment; Trip to Tetons Teaches Nature Is All Around." Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, August 25, 2003.
 
Oliver, Myrna. "Margaret 'Mardy' Murie, 101; Helped Create Arctic Refuge." Los Angeles Times, October 22, 2003.
 
Williams, Terry Tempest, ed. The Teton Science School: An Experiment That Works. Teton Science School, 1988.

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NGS Resources
Norman, Geoffrey. "Prime Time in the Tetons." National Geographic Adventure (August 2004), 78-84.
 
Fuller, Alexandra. "
Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks." National Geographic (November 2003), 104-23.
 
Kerosote, Ted. "Essential Grand Teton: An Insider's Guide to the National Park." National Geographic Traveler (November/December 2000), 96-105.
 
Hodgson, Bryan. "Grand Teton." National Geographic (February 1995), 116-40.
 
Leydet, François. "Grand Teton—A Winter's Tale." National Geographic (July 1979), 148-52.
 
Boyer, David S. "Wyoming: High, Wide, and Windy." National Geographic (April 1966), 554-94.
 
Simpich, Frederick. "Grass Makes Wyoming Fat." National Geographic (August 1945), 153-88.

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