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Alien Invaders



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Sea of Green
Photograph by Melissa Farlow

A Georgia highway cuts through roiling waves of kudzu, a tenacious Asian plant imported as an ornamental and for animal feed and, until the 1950s, planted along roadways for erosion control. The plant has taken hold and won't let go, becoming something of a southern icon. Its ubiquity has had a profound effect on people who live near it, says James Miller, a weed scientist with the U.S. Forest Service in Alabama. "The story of kudzu is a story of resignation," he says. "Some folks of the Southeast say, 'We can't do anything about invasives. After all, we haven't been able to do anything about kudzu.' But they're wrong. Many people are doing something to stop kudzu, and they are winning."

Photo Fast Facts

Camera: Canon 20D
Film Type: Digital
Lens: 16-35mm
Speed and F-Stop: 1/8 @ f/11
Weather Conditions: Sunny
Time of Day: Early afternoon
Lighting Techniques: Available light and slow shutter speed


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