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Arctic Hunters
JANUARY 2006
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In Learn More the National Geographic magazine team shares some of its best sources and other information to expand your knowledge of our featured subjects. Special thanks to the Research Division.

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 Did You Know?  
 Related Links  
 Bibliography  
 NGS Resources  

Did You Know?Did You Know?

We've all heard about increased ice melt at the Poles because of global warming and how it is causing sea level to rise everywhere, but the problem is not just that polar ice caps are melting. Nearly 50 percent of the cause of sea level rise is due to a phenomenon known as thermal expansion—as water heats up, it expands. This means that there is not an increase in water, but rather, the existing water takes up more volume. And where is this excess water headed? Some of the consequences of sea level rise include loss of coastal wetlands, barrier islands, and a greater risk of flooding in coastal communities.
 
—Nora Gallagher

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Related Links

Arctic Paradise
academic.bowdoin.edu/arcticmuseum/exhibits/greenland.shtml
Discover more about the lives and culture of the people of northwest Greenland at the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum exhibit "This Extraordinary Paradise: Living in Northwest Greenland."
 
Greenland Melt
cires.colorado.edu/science/groups/steffen/greenland/melt2005
The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences is using satellite data to monitor the extent to which Greenland's ice sheet is thinning and receding. Look here to view 3D images and learn more.
 
Local Description
iserit.greennet.gl/hansje/indexe.html
Explore the site of a local Greenlander to see more pictures of the people and places written about in the feature article.
 
Arctic Wildlife
www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/html/sea_mammals.html
Greenland and its surrounding waters are home to wildlife with extreme adaptations to a frigid climate. Visit the Smithsonian Institution's Arctic Study Center to discover more about these animals.
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Bibliography

Ehrlich, Gretel. The Future of Ice: A Journey into Cold. Pantheon Books, 2004.

Ehrlich, Gretel. This Cold Heaven: Seven Seasons in Greenland. Vintage Books, 2001.

Freeman, Milton M. R. Endangered Peoples of the Arctic: Struggles to Survive and Thrive. Greenwood Press, 2000.

Kankaanpää, Paula. Arctic Flora and Fauna: Status and Conservation. Edita, 2001.
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NGS Resources

"Signs From Earth: Heating Up…Melting Down." National Geographic (September 2004), 2-75.
 
Ehrlich, Gretel. "The Endless Hunt." National Geographic Adventure (September/October 2000), 130-40, 163. 
 
Hansen, Jens P. Hart. "The Mummies of Qilakitsoq." National Geographic (February 1985), 190-207.
 
Silis, Ivars. "Narwhal Hunters of Greenland." National Geographic (April 1984), 520-39.
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