[an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]




   
Feature
Cosmic Explosions
MARCH 2007
Feature Main Page
Photo Gallery
Learn More
Forum
Multimedia
Photo caption by Neil Shea
[an error occurred while processing this directive]


Previous Image 5 of 14 Next Image


Cosmic Explosions Gallery Photo Cosmic Leftover
Image by Jean-Charles Cuillandre, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Image optimization: Edizioni Scientifiche Coelum

The Crab Nebula's gaseous filaments spread across the dark fabric of space. This nebula is all that remains of a star that blew up 6,500 light-years away—one of the closest supernovas known. Early astronomers first noticed the supernova in A.D. 1054, when it glowed brightly enough to be seen during the day for several weeks. Much of the gas in this image is still pushing outward from the blast center, some of it at more than three million miles (five million kilometers) an hour.



Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 1 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 2 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 3 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 4 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 5 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 6 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 7 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 8 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 9 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 10 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 11 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 12 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 13 Cosmic Explosions Photo Gallery Thumbnail 14


E-Mail this Page to a Friend