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Global Fisheries Crisis
APRIL 2007
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Photo caption by David A. O'Connor
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Global Fisheries Crisis Gallery Photo

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Stripped Clean
Photograph by Randy Olson

A reef off Indonesia—laid bare to supply restaurants with live fish—now attracts divers searching for lobsters, the last remaining valuable species. The global trade in live reef fish may top a billion dollars a year, with many species captured by cyanide or traps. Use of dynamite to kill reef fish increases the toll taken by the live trade. In 2004, the humphead wrasse was the first reef fish listed by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.

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