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January 1998
Making Sense of the Millennium
Blackpool, England
Polar Bears
The Easy Ways of Altamaha
Labors of Love
Ode to Ice
Amelia Earhart
In Next Month’s Issue



Making Sense of the Millennium

As the year 2000 approaches and global mania builds, writer Joel L. Swerdlow and photographer George Steinmetz step back to consider six areas critical to future generations in this introduction to a two-year series.

Millennium

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Sita: Life of a Wild Tigress Blackpool, England

Braving chill waters and rambunctious crowds, Britons for decades have enjoyed the gaudy pleasures of this improbable seaside resort. Writer Bill Bryson and photographer Tomasz Tomaszewski joined the crowd of 17 million annual visitors.

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Polar Bears

Scientists follow the sea bear into the Arctic vastness, puzzling out how it hunts, breeds—and keeps from freezing to death. Staff writer John L. Eliot and photographer Flip Nicklin venture into the Arctic to document a research team that has been collecting data on polar bears for almost two decades.

Polar Bears
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The Easy Ways of the Altamaha The Easy Ways of Altamaha

Gnarled cypresses dot the marshes where herons stalk and gators laze and Georgians savor the tranquillity of their timeless river. “There is much to discover about the Altamaha, but it is discovered best if one relaxes and dreams,” writes Reg Murphy, President of the National Geographic Society and a resident of the Altamaha’s serene banks. Photographs by Peter Essick.


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Labors of Love

The National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration included Maya villagers among more than 200 grant recipients in 1997. Written by Dr. George Stuart, staff archaeologist and committee chair, “Labors of Love” is the third report on projects supported by the Society.

Labors of Love

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Ode to Ice
Ode to Ice

When a hard freeze transforms the Dutch landscape, canals sing with the music of skates. Photographer Co Rentmeester took nearly 20 years to complete this romantic photo essay.


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Amelia Earhart

The world’s most famous aviatrix vanished over the Pacific in 1937. Amelia Earhart’s untimely death helped assure that her pioneering achievements in the cockpit would not be forgotten. Article by Virginia Morell and photographs by Sarah Leen.

What do you think happened to Amelia Earhart? Your theories are welcome in our forum.

Amelia Earhart

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In Next Month’s Issue of NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC:

EXPLORATION: Where Do We Go Next?; Revolutions in Mapping; Why Explore?; Queen Maud Land; Jacques-Yves Cousteau; Brides of the Sahara; Remember the Maine?; Australia by Bike, Part Two.

 
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