Nationalgeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 


California’s Volcanic North



<< Back to Feature Page



View exclusive photographs and get the facts behind the frame.


Click to ZOOM IN >>


Click to ZOOM IN >>


Click to ZOOM IN >>


Click to ZOOM IN >>


Click to ZOOM IN >>



Powerful Presence

Powerful Presence
Photograph by Jim Richardson

Rising 10,000 feet (3,050 meters) above its base to a summit at 14,162 feet (4,300 meters), Mount Shasta is so massive that it creates its own weather. Shasta was built by four large volcanoes that laid down layer after layer of lava and debris over 300,000 years. The Hotlum Cone built the current summit, while, to its right, Shastina forms the mountain’s northwestern flank. Shasta has erupted on average once every 600 years for the past 4,500 years, but that statistic can be deceptive. “It’s like saying you’re going to have a thunderstorm in Washington, D.C., next summer. You know it’s going to happen; you just don’t know when,” says Michael Clynne, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Team. “The next one could be anytime.”



Camera: Nikon F-100
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia
Lens: Nikkor 300mm f/4
Speed and F-Stop: 1/125 @ f/11
Weather Conditions: Cloudy
Time of Day: Morning
Lighting Techniques: Available light

Special Equipment or Comments:
Used a tripod. Shot a little dark to highlight the break in the clouds.


© 2001 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE HOME Contact Us Forums Subscribe Contact Us Forums Subscribe