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California’s Volcanic North



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White on Black

White on Black
Photograph by Jim Richardson

Snow caps Little Glass Mountain, while Mount Shasta looms on the horizon. Part of the massive shield of the Medicine Lake volcano—at 900 square miles (2300 square kilometers), covering more area than any other volcano in the Cascades—Little Glass is a flow of rhyolite obsidian, also called volcanic glass, which erupted 1,100 years ago. Containing 74 percent silica, the rugged, nearly impassable rock formation is like a pile of broken glass covering two square miles (five square kilometers) to a depth of 200 feet (60 meters).



Camera: Nikon F-100
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia
Lens: Nikkor 20-35mm f/2.8
Speed and F-Stop: 1/250 @ f/8
Weather Conditions: Partly cloudy
Time of Day: Afternoon
Lighting Techniques: Photographed towards the sun.

Special Equipment or Comments:
Shot from a small plane looking towards the sun so that the bright light on the snow would highlight the lava flow.


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