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Kenya’s Mzima Spring



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So Near, and Yet So Far

So Near, and Yet So Far
Photograph by Mark Deeble and Victoria Stone

An ominous pair of Nile crocodiles, each about 11 feet (3 meters) long, hover near their favorite prey, unable to feast. By day, in the transparent purity of Mzima’s calm pools, fish can easily spot and avoid crocs. But at night crocs lie with mouths agape and slam their jaws on any fish that swims too close. While taking photographs underwater, Mark Deeble was attacked by a crocodile. “I was hitting him on the head with my camera housing, trying to beat him off,” says Deeble, who just barely escaped. After that he and partner Victoria Stone constructed protective underwater devices such as a glass-fronted “coffin” box. Lying safely within the box, they were able to take photographs like this one.



Camera: Nikon F90x
Film Type: Fujichrome 100
Lens: 20-35mm
Speed and F-Stop: 1/100 @ f/5.6
Weather Conditions: Dry season, full sun
Time of Day: 11 a.m.
Lighting Techniques: Natural light

Special Equipment or Comments:
This was photographed from a “blind” as the crocodiles approached a water buck carcass.


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