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Mount Etna Ignites



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Fiery Flow

Fiery Flow
Photograph by Carsten Peter

Exploding from a new fissure on the flank of Italy’s Mount Etna, lava forms an incandescent river beneath a scorching cloud of ash during an eruption that began on July 17, 2001, and subsided 24 days later.“The detonations were so loud they were heard all over eastern Sicily and made windows and doors vibrate in the town of Catania, 30 kilometers [nearly 20 miles] away,” says Boris Behncke, a volcanologist based on the island. Accounts of Etna’s eruptions stretch back to 1500 B.C., one of the world’s longest recorded histories of volcanic activity.



Camera: Nikon F90
Film Type: Fujichrome Velvia
Lens: 80mm
Speed and F-Stop: 1/2 @ f/4
Weather Conditions: Windy from the back
Time of Day: Early morning
Lighting Techniques: Natural


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