NationalGeographic.com [an error occurred while processing this directive]


 
Final EditThe image we rescued from the cutting room floor.

Kathy Moran

Illustrations editor Kathy Moran talks about cohesion of themes when selecting photos.


Cut It?
"The image of the birds was a nice one, but it could have been taken any number of places," says illustrations editor Kathy Moran. "We felt that it was the one photo we could remove from the story without compromising the portrayal of the ecosystem. The pictures of wolves, bears, salmon, Stellar's sea lions, even slugs were all more important in conveying a sense of Clayoquot Sound."

Or Keep It?
"We wanted to use this image and kept going back to it throughout the layout process," says design editor David Whitmore. "It provided an additional burst of energy that worked well with the pacing of the story. It stayed in right to the end, which made it a natural choice for Final Edit."


Final Edit

Photograph by Joel Sartore

To send this image as a postcard click here.


PACIFIC SUITE 
It's All a Blur
Hundreds of western sandpipers zoom into Vancouver Island's Clayoquot Sound to gorge on worms and crustaceans exposed on beaches at low tide. "They banked and twisted and turned like little fighter jets," says photographer Joel Sartore, who spent a week in spring downpours waiting for the birds to fly into focus.

The story's photo editor, Kathy Moran, and design editor David Whitmore liked the "poetic frenzy" of the image, but it was cut to create room for more pictures and text in "Shattered Sudan." "We're so focused on the articles we're working on, but there comes a time when we have to step back and look at the mix of stories in the whole issue," says Kathy. "The Sudan story deserved more space, more weight."

Check out "Pacific Suite," the feature story for which this photo was originally taken.

Joel Sartore

Zoom In on more images by Joel Sartore.





© 2003 National Geographic Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy       Advertising Opportunities       Masthead

National Geographic Magazine Home Contact Us Forums Shop Subscribe