Published: May 2007
Learn More
In Learn More the National Geographic magazine team shares some of its best sources and other information to expand your knowledge of our featured subjects. Special thanks to the Research Division.

Related Links

South Luangwa Conservation Society
This nonprofit community organization focuses on conservation and education in South Luangwa National Park and conducts antipoaching and antisnaring patrols.

Hippo Specialist Subgroup for the World Conservation Union
Learn about conservation, biology, and behavior of the common and pygmy hippos.

Luangwa Safari Network
Want to see Luangwa's wildlife firsthand? Explore the valley with experienced guides while staying in permanent lodges or seasonal bush camps.

Bibliography

Carr, Norman. Valley of the Elephants: The Story of the Luangwa Valley and Its Wildlife. Collins, 1979.

Estes, Richard Despard. The Behavior Guide to African Mammals. University of California Press, 1990.

Fry, Hilary, and Stuart Keith, eds. The Birds of Africa. Vol. 7. Princeton University Press, 2004.

Owens, Delia, and Mark Owens. Secrets of the Savanna: Twenty-three Years in the African Wilderness Unraveling the Mysteries of Elephants and People. Houghton Mifflin, 2006.

Owens, Delia, and Mark Owens. The Eye of the Elephant. Houghton Mifflin, 1992.

NGS Resources

Eckstrom, Christine K. "The Last Real Africa." National Geographic Traveler (March 2007), 86-94, 111-13.

Tsui, Bonnie, and others. "25 Wild Horizons." National Geographic Adventure (November 2006), 74-86, 88, 90-91.

Stone, George. "Safari Guide: 12 Epic Adventures in the Heart of Africa" National Geographic Traveler (September 2005), 95-8.

Fuller, Alexandra. "We Just Want Enough." National Geographic (September 2005), 100-21.

Fay, Michael J. The Last Place on Earth—With Mike Fay's Megatransect Journals. National Geographic Books, 2005.

Godwin, Peter. Wild at Heart: Man and Beast in Southern Africa. National Geographic Books, 2002.

Deeble, Mark, and Victoria Stone. "Kenya's Mzima Spring Comes Alive." National Geographic (November 2001), 32-47.