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Project: Biodiversity
How to Help
Photo: Rhinoceros
Harapan, a four-year-old male Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis), at White Oak Conservation Center.

Support the Biodiversity Project

If you like this work and want to see more of it, you can help support the Biodiversity Project by visiting www.joelsartore.com/galleries/the-biodiversity-project and purchasing a signed archival print, which start at $40. I believe that a print above the right kitchen table can have just as much of an impact as one in a gallery. The proceeds will help fund additional shoots.

Another way to support the Biodiversity Project is by visiting and patronizing your local zoo. Zoos and aquariums are vitally important to conservation today. Not only do they fund and manage captive breeding programs, but they are increasingly involved in conservation of habitat in the wild. Find an accredited zoo or aquarium in your area here: www.aza.org/findzooaquarium

Last but not least, learn more about your favorite animal. A simple web search will likely lead you to the organizations working on its conservation. Support them. And share what you know with your friends and family. The more people who are informed and who care, the better.

 

Zoos of the Great American Zoo Trip

Sunset Zoo Manhattan, Kansas
Home to over 250 animals from five continents, Sunset Zoo is nestled in the Flint Hills of northeastern Kansas. The zoo is open 360 days a year and has been committed to inspiring conservation since its founding in 1933. Visitors to the 28-acre park will enjoy a tour of species from African chimpanzees to Asian snow leopards. This spring, Sunset Zoo will unveil two major expansion projects: the Nature Exploration Center, a nature themed education facility, as well as a new primate species along the Asian Forest Trail as part of the John Woodard Memorial Gibbons Exhibit. Learn more at SunsetZoo.com.

Fort Worth Zoo Fort Worth, Texas
The oldest zoo in Texas, the Fort Worth Zoo was founded in 1909 with one lion, two bear cubs, an alligator, a coyote, a peacock and a few rabbits. From these humble beginnings, the zoo has grown into a nationally ranked facility with more than 500 animal species and a world-famous reptile collection, which is housed in its Museum of Living Art. The Fort Worth Zoo has been ranked as one of the top five zoos in the nation by the USA Travel Guide, and the Zagat survey named it the No. 1 attraction in the Dallas Fort Worth metropolitan area. Visit online at fortworthzoo.org.

Houston Zoo Houston, Texas
Since its founding in 1922, the Houston Zoo has provided a unique educational and conservation resource that serves more than 1.8 million guests every year. Set in a 55-acre lush tropical landscape, the zoo is home to more than 6,000 exotic animals representing more than 800 species. The Houston Zoo is dedicated to the conservation of endangered species, the provision of engaging educational opportunities, and the creation of stimulating exhibits that broaden the experiences of guests and encourage their curiosity. Find more information at houstonzoo.org.

Help Joel rename the Biodiversity Project

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Michael “Nick” Nichols uses remote-controlled cars and copters to photograph lions of the Serengeti like never before.
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